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News Bulletin – 7 July 2018

1. Japan to Launch First LNG Bunkering Vessel in 2020

6 July 2018 : Central LNG Shipping Japan Corporation (CLS) placed an order a 3,500 m3 LNG bunkering vessel (LBV) on July 6, the first to be operated in Japan.

The joint venture company, established by Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, Chubu Electric Power, Toyota Tsusho Corporation, and Nippon Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha, ordered the new vessel from Japanese shipbuilder Kawasaki Heavy Industries.

The LBV, which is scheduled to be delivered during the period from September to December 2020, will feature 4,100 tons. According to the shipbuilder, the vessel will have a length of 81.7 meters and a breadth of 18 meters.

The four companies jointly established CLS and Central LNG Marine Fuel Japan Corporation in May 2018 to launch the LNG Bunkering Business in the Chubu region of Japan. The LBV will be owned and managed by CLS, and LNG will be supplied to end-users through CLMF.

2. Climate Change Affects Ports in India

6 July 2018 : Among the various impacts of human-induced climate is that it may change the shorelines across the globe. change within the intensity and pattern of winds, waves, tides, and currents threaten many cities that were once proud of their coasts. But, however exactly does climate change affect the ports on these shores, and what can port authorities do to be prepared for these changes? using climate modelling experiments, researchers from Indian Institute of Technology bombay have simulated what was, and what can be the state of shorelines, focusing mainly on the Paradip Port of Odisha. they have predicted an increase in the wind speed, wave height and transport of sand on the coast.

The researchers of the study used a climate model resulting from the ‘Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment’ (CORDEX), developed by the World Climate Research Program. They simulated waves in two-time slices, from 1981 to 2005 and from 2011 to 2035, and thereafter they estimated the sediment transport and shoreline changes during these time periods. The study assumes no construction or developmental activities on the coastline for the next 25 years and does not account for the increase in sea-levels due to global warming which was found to be very small in some of the previous studies. Hence, the predictions are the ‘bare minimum’ changes that can be expected at the Paradip Port.

The researchers also suggest alternative strategies to minimise the effects of climate change on our shorelines. Restricting human intervention in these areas to the minimum, balancing the need for developmental activities and conservation, and following the coastal zone regulation norms goes a long way in safeguarding our coasts, they say. Also, assessing the impacts of proposed irrigation projects that could cause water-logging and intrusion of salinity, and planning for activities like beach nourishment, dune restorations, afforestation, mangrove conservation could also help.

People must know that climate will not remain the same in the future, it will change. Most probably, it will result in intensified climatic conditions, and hence future planners of the coastal ecosystem should take into account the changing climate and devise the mitigation strategies accordingly, rather than basing strategies on past climatic conditions”, suggests Prof. Deo.

3. Toyota sends the world’s first hydrogen-powered ship on a six-year voyage

5 July 2018 : Toyota is sponsoring the world’s first autonomous hydrogen-powered ship on a six-year world tour. The specially customize race boat, Energy Observer, uses solar, wind and wave-generated power – similarly as carbon-free hydrogen generated from seawater.

The base technology already exists to be used onto land, where it helps overcome the issue of intermittent power supply from renewable’s, however this is the first time it has been used at sea to produce hydrogen ‘live’ during stopovers and navigation.

The ship creates hydrogen by demineralizing seawater (removing salt and ions), then separating the oxygen and hydrogen through electrolysis. The hydrogen is compressed at 350-700 bar, then stored in tanks able to be employed in the energy stacks once required.

4. British Ports Association calls for border continuity ahead of Brexit White Paper

As the UK cabinet prepares for an away day’ at Chequers this week, the british Ports Association (BPA) has urged Ministers to agree a proposal which will ensure goods continue to flow uninterrupted between uk and EU ports post-Brexit.

The BPA has called for the government to seek compatibility with the EU on plant and animal health standards, that may lead to potetial challenges for few ports and specially at roll-on roll-off ferry terminals. this can be a vital part of ensuring trade continues to flow freely through our ports after Brexit. under present EU rules, plant and animal products might be subject to a extremely disruptive inspection regime at the border.

This could be problematic for all kinds of port handling such European trade but the most challenging would be in respect of HGVs at ports such as dover, Holyhead, Immingham and Portsmouth. to require lorries to stop and undergo time-consuming inspections at ports may lead to significant disruption at the border and create congestion around ports.

5. Indian Ports Act to cover entire coastline

3 July 2018 : The government extended the Indian Ports Act (IPA), 1908, to the entire coastline excluding the waters of the Visakhapatnam Port Trust (VPT), notified reserve forests and the mangrove forest land. The Director of Ports at Kakinada had been designated as the coastal conservator.

The coastline, the second largest in India, is booming with significant activity including oil exploration in the Krishna-Godavari (KG) basin and hence the government felt that the absence of a regulator limited its capacity to position the State as the gateway to the South East Asian countries as part of the ‘Act East’ policy. 

The decision would enable the government keep track of the significant activities comprising oil exploration and drilling under production sharing contracts with the Centre, laying of industrial effluent discharge pipelines, water pipelines, tourism projects etc.

The coastal conservator had been authorised to collect charges for the activities. Applications are to be made through Mee Seva Centres and other designated officers.

6. Tanker refloated after being aground for 2 weeks

3 July 2018 : Product tanker 19 WINNER was refloated on Jul 2 with high tide and tugs assistance, when being aground for two weeks. She was delivered to anchor at Kaohsiung Anchorage. global Maritime Salvage was deployed in salvage.

7. Shipping Industry Launches New Security Resources for World Fleet

29 June 2018 : International shipping trade organisations, with military support, have launched a brand new website dedicated to providing comprehensive maritime security direction to firms and mariners. The new web site www.maritimeglobalsecurity.org provides security-related guidance produced by the industry also as links to alternative useful maritime and military security resources. 

The aim is to ease access for firms and seafarers to maritime security related information and instruction . Central to the website are new best exercise guides to help firms and mariners risk assess voyages and mitigate against external threats to their safety.

These are covered in three publications:

Global Counter Piracy Guidance for Companies, Masters and Seafarers is a new publication containing guidance on piracy and armed robbery that can be used by mariners around the world.

BMP5: Best Management Practices to Deter Piracy and Enhance Maritime Safety in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea contains guidance for region-specific threats.

The third edition of the Guidelines for Owners, Operators and Masters for protection against piracy and armed robbery in the Gulf of Guinea region is also provided.

8. UAE committed to protecting rights of seafarers

29 June 2018 : The UAE can do what it will to help seafarers abandoned by ship owners, a top official said on Wednesday. The official said the UAE has signed international agreements to protect the rights of seafarers also as issued circulars on ship firms that have mistreated their employees.

The comments were made by Dr Abdullah Mohammad Bel Haif Al Nuaimi, Minister of Infrastructure Development, during a press briefing about the UAE’s participation at the International Day of the Seafarer conference that took place in Poland earlier this month.
“We have recently signed an agreement with the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) that will help and assist them with their mission,” Dr Al Nuaimi said referencing the memorandum of understanding (MoU) that was signed in May between the Federal Transport Authority – Land and Maritime (FTA) and the ITF. Under the agreement, the UAE will work with the ITF to protect the rights of seafarers in the UAE’s waters.

He added that “The signing of the MoU is a part of the FTA’s efforts to preserve the rights of seafarers on board ships to work in a safe working environment and enjoy decent living conditions, as well as provide insurance on the responsibilities of ship owners towards seafarers in the event of abandonment of seafarers on-board national and foreign vessels anchored in the UAE’s territorial waters,”.

Dr Al Nuaimi said, “the FTA had also been issuing notices on its website on shipping companies that were mistreating their sailors. “It’s on our website. We also circulate notices to the International Maritime Organisation and they share this information with all of their members. So we circulate about the source [of the problem and the company.”

9. Marine Environment Protection for Southeast Asia Seas Project Launched

27 June 2018 : Seven asean countries have formally launched an ambitious initiative aimed at rising the environmental health of the seas within the region, through the implementation of key International Maritime Organisation (IMO) marine environment protection treaties.

Senior decisions makers of maritime administrations of the beneficiary ASEAN countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam) met for their first high-level regional meeting in Bali, Indonesia (25-27 June), to kick-start the “Marine Environment Protection for Southeast Asia Seas (MEPSEAS) Project”.

The ASEAN Maritime Transport Working Group (ASEAN MTWG), the highest regional policy making body dealing with maritime matters in the region, will act as the advisory body for the MEPSEAS project.

The four-year MEPSEAS project (2018-2021) will targeting on enhancing the countries capacity to implement a number of high-priority treaties, as well as the International Convention for the prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL); the Anti-Fouling Systems Convention; the London dumping of wastes at sea convention and protocol; and the Ballast Water Management Convention.

Mr. R. Agus H. Purnomo, Director General for Sea Transportation under Ministry of Transportation, Government of Republic of Indonesia, said that the MEPSEAS project provided an opportunity for the countries to tackle the risks the marine environment faced in the region and support sustainable growth in the maritime sector.

The MEPSEAS project will promote national legal and policy developments and related capacity building in port and flag state inspections to support enforcement of the selected Conventions. The Project is also expected to support specific port biological baseline survey training, the green Shipping-Green Port-Green Shipyards (GGG) initiative of the Philippines and the holding of a regional maritime technology conference, among other activities.

The MEPSEAS project is a clear demonstration of the continued commitment of the ASEAN countries to move towards a sustainable maritime transport system and to address significant marine environmental issues,” said Jose Matheickal, Deputy Director (Major Projects) of IMO.

10. Ports Must Plan For Electric Charging

26 June 2018 : Electric powertrains can solve global co2 emissions challenges however terminals need to account for charging requirements, according to an electromobility skilled.

Speaking to GreenPort at TOC Europe, Niklas Thulin, director of electromobility at Volvo Penta, said it had been “inevitable” that electrical powertrains would effectively tackle carbon dioxide emissions, as well as meet town emissions necessities for ports, however, ports and terminals within the process of electrification have to be inspect their operations and work out how and where charging is incorporated as this can help to create the transition much faster.

He advised: “One of the challenges we see in electrifying mobile equipment is that it requires charging and charging will of course in some way disturb current processes.

You need to accommodate charging into your operation. Ports that are more open to planning their processes and ports – either retrofits or new ports – to accommodate this charging, will benefit the most from electrification.”

He added: “I think electric power trains really have an opportunity to change and disrupt how port machines are operated short term. There’s quite a lot of experience from electric trucks and buses that we can apply to material handling machines already.”

11. Day of the Seafarer: Mental Wellbeing in Focus

26 June 2018 :This year International Maritime Organisation’s (IMO) targeted on seafarers wellbeing. 2017 and 2018 have seen powerful momentum within the business to handle seafarer wellbeing, particularly their mental health. This campaign is focused around specific plans to tackle stress and other issues affecting seafarers mental conditions – and create the tools available more widely known.

The IMO encourages shipowners, suppliers and anyone else to use the hashtag #SupportSeafarersWellbeing to share how they provide good working environments on board, and how they address challenges in terms of seafarers mental wellbeing. Beyond that, seafarers are motivate to share positive stories and situations of a good working environment at sea by using the hashtag #GoodDayatSea.

12. New report reveals impact of digital access on seafarers well-being and social connections

26 June 2018 :A new report observing at crew connectivity on ships has disclosed the emotional and operational impact on professional seafarers who are usually away for up to 6 months at a time with limited opportunities to interact digitally with friends and family.

The report showed that access to Wi-Fi aboard ships – even limited – helped reduce some of the emotional stresses that come with separation from families. However, the research also showed that where there were weekly limits of connectivity, this forced seafarers to ration their allowance to certain periods or to prioritise contact with friends. restricting usage also meant that domestic problems couldn’t be resolved immediately or in real time, adding to personal stress or anxiety.

Digital connectivity at sea has been one of the major talking points of the decade in the maritime industry, which has been slow to adopt technology enabling improvements in connectivity across the world’s commercial fleet,” said Dr Rikke Bjerg Jenson, one of the principal researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London. 

References

– researchmatters.in 

– hellenicshippingnews.com

– worldmaritimenews.com

– maritimeprofessional.com

– techradar.com

– bunkerportsnews.com

Categories: News Digest

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