Estonia Witnesses the Inauguration of its First Autonomous Maritime Research Vessel by Scientists

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The University of Tartu’s Estonian Marine Institute has developed a robotic vessel called Heli, which has a range of 300 kilometers and will be used primarily for studying shoals of fish. However, in the future, similar approaches could be used for larger autonomous platforms and for various purposes, according to Markus Vetemaa, head of the institute. The vessel’s software solution was developed by a researcher at Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech). Vetemaa stated that the first study using Heli will focus on herring and turbot, followed by seabed mapping, water sampling, and phytoplankton sampling. The vessel could also be used to monitor marine infrastructure, such as undersea cables, and conduct wildlife surveys.

Heli, a robotic vessel developed by the University of Tartu’s Estonian Marine Institute, will be used to study wind farm territories and herring stocks. The vessel has a range of 300 kilometers and could potentially be used for larger autonomous platforms in the future. The software solution for Heli was developed by a researcher at Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech). Markus Vetemaa, head of the Estonian Marine Institute, explained that the initial studies using Heli will focus on herring and turbot, followed by seabed mapping and water sampling. Heigo Mölder, a researcher at TalTech, added that the vessel could also be used for monitoring marine infrastructure and conducting wildlife surveys.

Heli, a robotic vessel developed by the University of Tartu’s Estonian Marine Institute, will be used for studying shoals of fish, wind farm territories, and herring stocks. The vessel has a range of 300 kilometers and could potentially be used for a variety of purposes in the future. The software solution for Heli was developed by a researcher at Tallinn University of Technology (TalTech). Markus Vetemaa, head of the Estonian Marine Institute, stated that the initial studies using Heli will involve hydroacoustic study of herring and turbot, seabed mapping, water sampling, and phytoplankton sampling. Heigo Mölder, a researcher at TalTech, added that the vessel could also be utilized for monitoring marine infrastructure, such as undersea cables, and conducting wildlife surveys.

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